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Access Control

Voice biometrics demand to hit $2.8bn by 2024

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

The global Voice Biometrics Market size is expected to grow from $984 million in 2019 to $2,845 million by 2024, equivalent to a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 23.7%

That’s according to a new report from MarketsandMarkets, which says the key factors driving demand include an increasing need for robust fraud detection and prevention systems across the Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance (BFSI) industry vertical and a need for reducing authentication and identification costs.

North America is expected to account for the largest market size in the Voice Biometrics Market by region during the forecast period. The region is home to many key vendors, such as Nuance Communications, Verint, and Pindrop.

APAC is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period with increasing investments in strengthening security infrastructure. An increasing demand for cloud-based solutions from retail and eCommerce and healthcare verticals is expected to drive the Voice Biometrics Market in the region.

Overall, the report identifies the key market players as Nuance Communications (US), NICE (Israel), Verint (US), AimBrain (UK), Voice Biometrics Group (US), Phonexia (Czech Republic), OneVault (South Africa), SESTEK (Turkey), LumenVox (US), LexisNexis Risk Solutions (US), VoicePIN (Poland), Uniphore (India), Pindrop (US), Aculab (UK) and Auraya (Australia).

60% of multinationals think their access control isn’t future-proof

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Nedap Security Management presented several key conclusions from its benchmark study at ASIS Europe 2019, including worrying feedback from business leaders when it comes to access control.

The study focuses on the access control challenges and opportunities faced by multinationals – both now and in the future.

One significant finding was that almost 60% of multinationals don’t (yet) consider their access control system to be future-proof.

The results were presented by Martin Wijlens and Timon Padberg, global client sales managers for Nedap Security Management.

Wijlens said: “Our benchmark study gives multinationals useful peer-to-peer insight into the status, challenges and opportunities of their access control systems. It zooms in on topics such as convenience versus danger, infrastructure and map technology.”

Padberg added: “Due to increasing globalisation and constant changes, the international standardisation of security aspects such as access control is becoming increasingly important. We support multinationals with concrete insights based on market research, and also alleviate their concerns, not to mention workload and stress, through our Global Client Programme.”

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Centralized, multi-site door access control made simple

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Problem: Most access control systems are site-centric, driven by local databases of staff permissions, so when it comes to trying to oversee or manage building access for sites in different locations, sharing and synchronising access information requires additional appliances and significantly increases system complexity.

Enterprise-class solutions for physical access management require substantial up-front investment and still typically rely on installing dedicated sync-servers at each site to duplicate data across locations.

Solution: Leverage existing enterprise-wide IT access control infrastructure that’s designed to deliver centralized visibility and control, in real-time, across all networked sites. Simply add controlled doors to the network – just like connecting a PC – and have staff-access similarly managed.

The EdgeConnector physical access system addresses door access control in exactly this way – radically simplifying the solution and making it limitlessly scalable, covering all sites, all connected doors, and all users, automatically.

Companies often expand to new sites through acquisition, making it likely that different access control systems are used at each location. Integrating unalike systems to provide organization-wide physical access management then becomes a far greater challenge, requiring ether the rip-out and replacement of a legacy system or comparably expensive development of bridging systems. 

EdgeConnector works with existing credentials and readers (that use the industry standard Wiegand interface) avoiding the need to change much of the hardware for legacy systems. EdgeConnector also works with a range of compatible wired and wireless door controllers – avoiding the need to swap-out these devices in some cases, although installation typically only requires a single network cable supporting PoE+ for wired door control and PoE for wireless door control.

IP network based door access systems can provide real-time control and economical scalability, EdgeConnector takes this further by making use of the existing centralized staff database used for IT-access (typically Microsoft Active Directory) to handle door access permissions. This approach streamlines the infrastructure required, which in-turn facilitates streamlined access administration processes. Taking the the critical process of staff off-boarding as an example – it’s possible to ensure all door access privileges, for all premises, as well as all IT-access permissions,  for an individual are rescinded in just one step.

Unifying IT and physical access infrastructure is consistent with the trend over recent years for IT teams to be involved in the selection and integration of physical access control systems. An HID published survey1found that well over 70% of organizations expect IT departments to influence physical security technology decisions and to integrate physical access controls into the wider IT ecosystem.

IT teams have their own interests in being involved – taking a holistic approach to an organization’s security avoids the risk of physical access, and physical access systems, providing a ‘weak link’ in an otherwise robust cyber-security strategy. By ensuring all elements of critical infrastructure, including door access controls, are properly secured through standard support practises, organizations can avert issues arising from siloed infrastructure that may otherwise avoiding regular scrutiny.

Summary

Building access control systems using contactless identity credentials, such as RFID cards, fobs or mobile phones, are commonly used in all but the smallest of organizations. By being able to easily manage who has permission to use what doors and when, together with the ability to quickly revoke access for lost credentials and former staff, access control systems provide organizations with the control they need without impeding or inconveniencing their personnel. However, the issue that frequently comes-up is the complexity involved in trying to extend a physical access control system to cover sites in different locations.

EdgeConnector makes use of the power of existing IT-access controls, and the scalability of IP-network infrastructures, to minimising the cost and capital expenditure required to control access through connected doors, car barriers and other controlled opening, across all sites and for all staff.

For more information on centralized, multi-site physical access control management contact EdgeConnector:

www.edgeconnector.com

+44 (0)1428 685 861

1https://www.hidglobal.com/doclib/files/resource_files/the_rising_role_of_it_in_physical_access_control_-_final.pdf

Global electronic access control market to hit $13bn by 2023

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

The global electronic access control market will grow from $8.2 billion in 2017 to $13.3 billion by 2023, equivalent to a CAGR of 8.53% during the forecast period.

That’s according to the latest forecasts from Market Research Future, which includes all electromechanical hardware devices that used to limit access into any private premise in its calculations.

That definition encompasses systems that are used in several fields ranging from commercial space, government spaces and private residential space.

A rise in crime rates in key territories, and a growing need to limit individual premise access are cited as the key drivers for the market.

By type, the market is segmented into biometrics reader, card-based reader, multi-technology readers, electronic locks, and controllers.

The biometric reader market segment is estimated to hold the highest market share throughout the forecast period, and it is also expected to register the highest CAGR.

Market research Futures says these categories are more reliable as they provide benefits such as improved identification and authentication process, thereby increasing the access control to physical and electronic resources.

On the basis of application, the study was segmented into commercial spaces, military & defence, government, residential, education, healthcare, industrial, and others.

The forecasts predict the commercial spaces segment will dominate the market going forward, including data centres, banks, hotels, retail stores, malls, and similar other commercial premises.

The key players highlighted include ASSA ABLOY (Sweden), Johnson Controls International (Ireland), dormakaba Holding (Switzerland), Allegion (Ireland), Honeywell Security Group (US), Identiv (US), Nedap (Netherlands), Suprema HQ (South Korea), Bosch Security Systems (US) and Gemalto (Netherlands).

Asia-Pacific is estimated to register the highest CAGR during the forecast period. The growth in the region is attributable to factors including ongoing industrial development, rapid pace of commercialization, and rise in number of security systems implementation across varied commercial spaces.

Furthermore, the rise in crimes rates in the region and growing government spending to enhance security systems in their premises also drive the growth.

North America, however, is expected to dominate the electronic access control systems market from 2018 to 2023 as the region has a sustainable and well-established economy and it is among the early adopter of latest technology.

Furthermore, the presence of the leading manufacturers in the region further drive the electronic access control systems market there.

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Simpler, stronger access control through identity driven security

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Physical and IT security work seamlessly together with EdgeConnector door access control software; delivering streamlined permissions administration, a simplified infrastructure that gives central oversight across all sites as standard, as well as cyber-physical protection capabilities that support information security and compliance.

Security professionals can now leverage the power and flexibility of an IT network’s existing access management infrastructure, to protect people and premises, in addition to data. EdgeConnector’s unique approach to physical access management aligns door access control with IT-access control; both driven by a single shared directory of users, identities and permissions (typically using Windows® Active Directory). This radically simplified system architecture provides significant benefits over traditional models:

Streamlined administration –data duplication and separate workflows can be dispensed with, so for critical processes like staff off-boarding, it’s possible to ensure all access privileges, to all premises and for all IT network resources, are rescinded in just one step. Role-based security models can combine door and IT access rights, maintaining consistency between the physical and logical access granted to staff whenever they change job function.

Organisational fit– the rationalised, standards-based infrastructure is inherently scalable and easier for IT teams to support, giving Security teams the flexibility to manage the protection of the organisation as needs change. EdgeConnector’s dedicated physical access administration console provides authorised users with comprehensivecontrol and monitoring tools.  Alternatively, physical access rights can be incorporated into wider security permissions profiles, for allocation to staff through an existing Identity and Access Management platform. 

Central oversight– monitoring physical access across all locations and managing multi-site permissions for personnel are standard features with EdgeConnector, without any need for the complexities of installing additional infrastructure to share physical access information between sites.

Real-time control– changes to physical permissions take immediate effect at all doors, thanks to the online architecture.

SIEM by design– cyber-physical control capabilities can automatically prevent access exceptions that would otherwise require manned monitoring of alerts from additional Security Information and Event Management systems. User-location based controls can easily be applied, restricting digital access to sensitive data to within secure areas. Example usage includes: denial of access to patient medical records, or customer payment card processing, or financial trading applications unless authorised users are in nominated locations, blocking of Wi-Fi access outdoors, and prevention of privileged access to critical server administration functions from outside the data centre.

Straightforward installation– by making use of the existing user directory and IT network infrastructure, minimal effort is required to connect and control any number of doors at any number of sites. Compatible door control hardware from Assa Abloy, Axis and HID can all be used on any standard IP network, including VPN, WAN and Cloud configurations. 

EdgeConnector’s standards-based approach extends to the credential used for door access. As well as mobile phone and biometric options an extensive range of contactless card standards can be used, including existing cards and readers if desired. To protect against the risk from card-cloning, an easy-to-use tool for managing bespoke RFID encryption keys allows organisations to securely encode popular cards for themselves. 

For more information, visit www.edgeconnector.com or call +44 (0)1428 685 861

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: One ID for all access – Secure, convenient & manageable

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Hybrid smartcards are the most secure and cost-effective solution for providing staff with just one credential for all identity and access applications – making life easier for employees and strengthening security by enforcing desired behaviours. 

Organisations typically have many different  systems that require user identity verification in addition to building access control, such as secure logon to the IT network, the release of documents from printers and cashless canteen vending.

Making it possible for each staff member to use just one ID for all these identity and access applications not only makes life easier for them, which aids their productivity, but also strengthens security across the organisation by enforcing behaviours that ensure protective measures are not circumvented (such as by the loan of door access cards to colleagues, or by leaving logged-on computers unattended).

Furthermore, having just one user identity database for all applications, enterprise-wide, avoids wasteful resource duplication and significantly reduces overall costs.

Why smartcards

Hybrid smartcards can combine a separate contactless RFID interface chip with a contact chip in the same card body. This enables the best choice of standards-based contact and contactless technologies to be selected for an organisation’s specific requirements.

Contactless applications, including building access, can make use of up-to-date technologies, including DESFire, iCLASS and SEOS, which support mutual authentication with card readers before transferring encrypted identification information. It’s also possible for multiple RFID chips to be incorporated, in order to support migration from insecure legacy technologies, or to accommodate completely separate physical access control systems.

Contact smartcard chips are ideally suited to PKI-based 2-factor authentication (2FA) security applications, such as network logon, disk encryption, email encryption and digital signatures. They provide the ‘gold-standard’ in security by utilising private keys that are generated and stored securely in the chip, protected against external access, and never shared. The chip hardware from established manufacturers includes design features that prevent keys from being extracted, even if probed by an electron microscope, and so achieve certification to the highest international standards, such as EAL 5+ and FIPS 140-2.

The actual security of any digital credential ultimately depends on how well its encryption keys are protected. As mentioned already, contact smartcard chips have been certified to the highest security standards. Mobile devices support 2FA by hosting various app and cloud-based implementations of cryptographic algorithms; software-based solutions are at greater risk from malware attack and the security of encryption keys depends very much on the particular mobile device and OS in question.

Mobile device based credentials appear to offer a convenient alternative to having to issue each staff member with smartcards, they do however introduce the burden of managing and maintaining multiple apps and device platforms, a task that becomes even more complex as these proliferate over time.

Issuing employees with smartcards commonly supports wider site security requirements, as they can be printed on for use as an easily recognisable company ID, bearing a photo of the user and worn on a lanyard.

While mobile credentials solutions for an ever widening range of identity and access applications have become increasingly available, their adoption is currently limited by their much greater cost in comparison to well-established smartcard solutions.

Security benefits of converged credentials

Process

Combining the forms of identification required for both logical access and physical access, into a single ‘converged credential’, facilitates streamlined management and administration for critical process like staff on-boarding and off-boarding.

Card Management Systems (CMS’s) help organisations deploy and manage smartcards quickly, efficiently and securely. Hybrid cards can be managed easily with CMS tools that connect to enterprise directories, card printers, certificate authorities, and more.

People

Staff always tend to find the most expedient ways of getting their work done, even if short-cuts may result in security vulnerabilities. Issuing each staff member with a single card for door access as well as IT-access (amongst other uses) naturally compels them to always carry their ID-cards with them at all times, strengthening overall security by:

  • Ensuring credentials with photo-ID are consistently worn by staff moving around a site.
  • Quashing the practise of lending door access cards to colleagues.
  • Automatically logging-off or locking computers whenever left unattended by users, who have to remove their ID card to pick-up a coffee or collect a document from a printer for example.

Technology

Hybrid smartcards allow organisation to mix-&-match established standard contactless and contact technologies to fit their precise needs; providing the flexibility to integrate with an extensive range of identity and access applications using just one ID card.

In addition, fully-online and integrated door access control systems can be used to ensure that users can only log on to their PC, or access other IT resources, if they have badged through a door, thus eliminating most ‘pass-back’ and ‘tailgating’ issues with building access cards.

For more information on converged identity and access management solutions contact Dot Origin:

www.dotorigin.com/smart-card-based-solutions/converged-access/

+44 (0)1428 685 861

Physical security demand to hit $119bn by 2023

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

It’s been predicted that the global physical security market will to grow in value from $84.1 billion last year to $119.4 billion by 2023.

That’s equivalent to a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.3%, according to analysis from ResearchandMarkets.

Its report, The ‘Physical Security Market by Component and Services, Organisation Size, Vertical and Region – Global Forecast to 2023’ found that (deep breath) rising incidents of terror attacks, technological advancements and deployment of wireless technology in security systems, increasing use of IP-based cameras for video surveillance, implementation of mobile-based access control, and adoption of Internet of Things (IoT)-based security systems with cloud computing platforms are projected to drive the growth of the market across the globe.

However, violation of privacy related to physical security systems and services is expected to restrict the growth of the market across the globe in some instances.

The Services segment is projected to lead the physical security market during the forecast period. The report says physical security services play a vital role in enhancing the existing video surveillance system by integrating digital video surveillance with network and IT systems.

This integration enhances property safety and reduces loss from thefts. Moreover, the service segment is being continuously affected by the introduction of the integrated Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud (SMAC) solution, which need proper monitoring.

The Large Enterprises segment is expected to lead the physical security market in 2018. These enterprises were the early adopters of physical security solutions and services, as they have larger revenue pool to spend and a larger infrastructure to be protected.

High spending on security, followed by the high need for securing large assets is leading large enterprises to contribute to a higher market share in the physical security market.

The residential segment faces the challenge to manage security without violating the privacy of their guests, comfort, and travel experiences. In residential premises, the implementation of access control and video surveillance security systems is growing.

The residential properties are installing access control systems to prevent invasion and burglary. Residential properties are increasingly adopting electronic lock-based access control systems. The demand for electronic products is growing with the increased home automation trend.

The APAC physical security market is projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. This growth is primarily driven by the rising adoption of access control systems in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs), hospitality businesses, airports, ATMs, banks, residential buildings, and religious places, among others are expected to drive the physical security market.

Security systems are expected to witness increasing adoption in APAC as the countries in the region are emerging economies with a growing number of manufacturing bases, and there is also a constant risk of terror threats in the region.

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Secure your RFID access controls against card cloning

960 639 Stuart O'Brien

All security professionals need to be aware of RFID cloning vulnerabilities present in common door access control systems, and how to protect against them.

Some of the most widely used RFID access cards simply do not include any capability to prevent them from being read (and hence copied) inappropriately, and other common card-types have flawed security features that also allow them to be cloned using low-cost, hand-held card-copying kits.

It is possible, although rather impractical, to protect these cards with shielded cases that require the card to be extracted each time they need to be presented to a door access reader. There is also a risk from spoof-cards (purchased online without needing an original to copy), that will be read by standard door access readers.

Unfortunately, having cards and readers that are based on up-to-date secure RFID technology standards doesn’t automatically guarantee greater security; providers of physical access control systems often don’t make customers aware of the options available for configuring cards and readers, preferring to control that for their own benefit (simplifying deployment and maintaining card supply revenues).

To prevent card-cloning and spoofing, organisations need to make sure they are actually using the features that allow all their cards to be uniquely and securely encoded, so that cards can’t be read by any other readers, and their readers are configured to recognise only correctly encoded cards.

To secure RFID access controls, organisations ultimately need to have control over the encryption keys that are used to encode their access cards and configure their readers. Organisations don’t share their IT-admin passwords with third parties – so why should they be reliant on any number of individuals in a supply chain for access cards to protect their RFID encryption keys?

Key-ID Encoder is a cost-effective and easy-to-use solution for secure RFID card encoding. The Key-ID software makes it straightforward to create unique encryption keys, which are stored securely, and used to encode any RFID credentials that use NXP’s standard DESFire EV1 or EV2 chips.

Cards and fobs can be sourced freely and then encoded using the Key-ID kit, which includes a desktop reader/writer that connects via USB to any suitable Windows PC running the software. The reader/writer supplied also supports the use of a SAM (secure access module) to safeguard encryption keys. Enrolment of newly encoded cards into an access control system can be automated with the help of an additional software utility available from the same company.

Key-ID Encoder has been developed by Dot Origin Ltd, who specialise in identity, security and proximity solutions, using established security principles and based on industry standards.

For more information, visit www.key-id.com/encoder or call Dot Origin on +44 (0)1428 685 861.

GUEST BLOG: Protecting students – Access control in accommodation & on campus

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

By 2020 CCTV

It’s not unusual for a parent to be worried about their child when they venture off to university, especially when they’re moving out of the family home.

And a video that went viral earlier last year that recorded students at Nottingham Trent University chanting racist comments in front of the door of another student in their university accommodation (halls) — will only have heightened concerns from a parent’s perspective.

Filmed by first-year student Rufaro Chisango, her experiences were brought to the public’s attention when the video went viral on Twitter. Thankfully, with the advancements in technology and the implementation of access control systems in university halls, Rufaro was physically safe from any threat. But now, expectations must be higher to ensure that this type of behaviour, or risk, does not happen again.

Why is access control important on campus?

Access control should be an initial consideration when it comes to protecting a specific location, and there are two main functions to the systems that can be used. The first has a more basic yet effective approach and has the ability to enable or prevent someone from entering or exiting a location — this could range from the whole site, a wing of a building, or a singular room that needs protecting from unauthorised personnel.

On the other hand, the second function enables internal systems to monitor movements around the premises — which then allow security teams to conduct data trails for future audits.

When looking at university accommodation in particular, valid credentials are essential. The purpose of having such security measures in place is to help protect students from unauthorised access, which could potentially threaten their wellbeing or put their possessions at risk.

Parents and their children are entitled to have higher expectations when it comes to how secure their accommodation is, especially with an increase in fees. According to a survey carried out by Save The Student, the average cost of renting is £131 per week, which leaves students with £8 to live on after deducting the payment from their maintenance loan.

As such high costs can often leave students compromising on their lifestyle, their security should not factor into this. Although university culture does play a large part on student life, excessive and unordinary behaviour is not acceptable. It was found that 52% of students have noisy housemates, 37% of housemates steal food (considered as theft), 8% have dangerous living conditions, and an astonishing 6% have experienced a break in or a burglary.

As a result, one in three students believe that their accommodation isn’t worth the money. Now, there is a demand for larger investments into suffering areas — accommodation providers are under extreme amounts of pressure to make changes otherwise they could encounter detrimental damages that will impact them in the long run.

What are the benefits?

Whether they’re placed around campus buildings or within accommodation, access control systems have obvious advantages.  Evidently from the story above regarding Rufaro Chisango , it is critical to ensure the safety and protection of young people as unsolicited actions can be carried out without any prior detection.

Although access control is becoming more of a necessity across such locations, university accommodation providers are allowing students to become more selective with the type of flat they choose — loud or quiet, gender and more. However, there are still many faults. Universities should be looking at implementing more personal options that enable young people to properly filter down the type of roommates they are looking for — such as language, religion, race, and more to create a safer and more familiar environment for all.

But what are the core benefits?

Keys Can Be Deactivated — These keys can’t be copied once students have moved out of the complex as they will be deactivated for the next set of students. This removes the risk of any unauthorised entry and heightens the safety of the new tenant after the previous lease is up.

You Must Have Valid Credentials —If someone doesn’t have the correct credentials, they won’t be able to enter the building. As they require the swipe of a unique key card for entry permissions which are given only to students, this will make it difficult for anyone other those who are enrolled as residents to enter.

Observing Activity —Unlike old methods of monitoring who goes in and who goes out of a building, this data can be collected digitally. Using access control systems and key cards, this can all be documented and easily accessed when needed.

Limiting Access —One of the most important parts of access control is the ability to limit access and set permissions to certain users. This is particularly useful when it comes to accommodation employees such as cleaners, as their key cards can be matched with their shift patterns.

Adopting Modern Technology —Students in particular are avid users of smartphones and now, locked areas can be accessed through the use of such device as credentials are able stored safely; this is an extremely important new feature as smartphones are very rarely out of the hands of young people.

Young people deserve a safer environment to live in throughout their time at university. Are you ready to make the appropriate changes to guarantee safety? You can’t put a price on it.

Sources:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-43328566

http://www.net-ctrl.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/AAAC_Discussion_Paper_Students_fv-1.pdf

https://www.savethestudent.org/accommodation/national-student-accommodation-survey-2018.html

 

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Simpler, stronger access control through identity driven security

960 640 Stuart O'Brien

Physical and IT security work seamlessly together with EdgeConnector door access control software; delivering streamlined permissions administration, a simplified infrastructure that gives central oversight across all sites as standard, as well as cyber-physical protection capabilities that support information security and compliance.

Security professionals can now leverage the power and flexibility of an IT network’s existing access management infrastructure, to protect people and premises, in addition to data. EdgeConnector’s unique approach to physical access management aligns door access control with IT-access control; both driven by a single shared directory of users, identities and permissions (typically using Windows® Active Directory). This radically simplified system architecture provides significant benefits over traditional models:

Streamlined administration –data duplication and separate workflows can be dispensed with, so for critical processes like staff off-boarding, it’s possible to ensure all access privileges, to all premises and for all IT network resources, are rescinded in just one step. Role-based security models can combine door and IT access rights, maintaining consistency between the physical and logical access granted to staff whenever they change job function.

Organisational fit– the rationalised, standards-based infrastructure is inherently scalable and easier for IT teams to support, giving Security teams the flexibility to manage the protection of the organisation as needs change. EdgeConnector’s dedicated physical access administration console provides authorised users with comprehensivecontrol and monitoring tools.  Alternatively, physical access rights can be incorporated into wider security permissions profiles, for allocation to staff through an existing Identity and Access Management platform.

Central oversight– monitoring physical access across all locations and managing multi-site permissions for personnel are standard features with EdgeConnector, without any need for the complexities of installing additional infrastructure to share physical access information between sites.

Real-time control– changes to physical permissions take immediate effect at all doors, thanks to the online architecture.

SIEM by design– cyber-physical control capabilities can automatically prevent access exceptions that would otherwise require manned monitoring of alerts from additional Security Information and Event Management systems. User-location based controls can easily be applied, restricting digital access to sensitive data to within secure areas. Example usage includes: denial of access to patient medical records, or customer payment card processing, or financial trading applications unless authorised users are in nominated locations, blocking of Wi-Fi access outdoors, and prevention of privileged access to critical server administration functions from outside the data centre.

Straightforward installation– by making use of the existing user directory and IT network infrastructure, minimal effort is required to connect and control any number of doors at any number of sites. Compatible door control hardware from Assa Abloy, Axis and HID can all be used on any standard IP network, including VPN, WAN and Cloud scenarios. .

EdgeConnector’s standards-based approach extends to the credential used for door access. As well as mobile phone and biometric options an extensive range of contactless card standards can be used, including existing cards and readers if desired. To protect against the risk from card-cloning, an easy-to-use tool for managing bespoke RFID encryption keys allows organisations to securely encode popular cards for themselves.

For more information, visit www.edgeconnector.comor call +44 (0)1428 685 861