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Data

60% of firms optimistic about cloud sovereignty innovation and collaboration

918 612 Stuart O'Brien

Cloud sovereignty is increasingly becoming a priority for organizations looking for secure, innovative, and scalable solutions to manage their data, according to Capgemini Research Institute’s latest report, “The journey to cloud sovereignty: Assessing cloud potential to drive transformation and build trust”.

The report finds that cloud sovereignty adoption is primarily driven by regulation and organizations’ need to control their data, but they also expect it to build trust, foster collaboration, and accelerate the move to a data-sharing ecosystem.

According to the report, organizations have some concerns about using the public cloud as the core of digital transformation projects: 69% of organizations cite potential exposure to extra-territorial laws in a cloud environment, 68% a lack of transparency and control over what is done with their data in the cloud, and 67% mention operational dependency on vendors based outside their region’s jurisdiction.

A large majority of organizations globally believe they will adopt cloud sovereignty to ensure compliance with regulations (71%) or to bring in controls and transparency over their data (67%), whereas ensuring immunity from extra-territorial data access (65%) comes third.

Nearly half of organizations (43%) globally define cloud sovereignty as keeping their data within their preferred jurisdiction, whatever the origin of the cloud provider, whereas only 14% define it as the exclusive use of cloud providers based in the same legal jurisdiction.

When selecting a cloud provider, the four key factors organizations focus on primarily are identity, access management, and encryption (82%), isolation of their sensitive data in the cloud (81%) and cost competitiveness (69%) and having local/regional datacenters (66%).

Demand for cloud services is shifting in line with new expectations around sovereignty

When asked about their expected cloud environment for the next 1-3 years, more than one-third (38%) of organizations expect to have a public/hybrid cloud environment with local data centers. 30% expect to use a disconnected version or the local legal entity of a hyperscaler, whereas 11% plan to work exclusively with cloud providers based within the same legal jurisdiction.

Nearly half (48%) of public sector organizations are either already considering cloud sovereignty as a part of their cloud strategy or planning to include it in the next 12 months. They are slightly more driven by complying with regulations (76% versus 70% for private organizations) and ensuring immunity from extra-territorial data access (69% versus 64%). However, they are also expecting more data-related benefits from sovereign cloud than private organizations.

Fostering collaboration and data-sharing ecosystems

The report also indicates that, while meeting highest regulatory concerns and data security requirements, organizations are looking at cloud sovereignty to unlock the benefits of the cloud for them, including better collaboration, increased data sharing, greater trust, and opportunities for innovation. 60% of organizations believe that cloud sovereignty will facilitate sharing data with trusted ecosystem partners, and 42% of surveyed executives believe that a trusted interoperable cloud service can help them to scale new technologies such as 5G, artificial intelligence (AI), and the internet of things (IoT).

Marc Reinhardt, Head of Public Sector at Capgemini, said: “In our current environment, the sovereignty of one’s supply chain and IT has become truly strategic. For those organizations currently still reluctant to leverage the obvious benefits of the cloud, sovereignty is a way to get there. As a result, it is gaining importance across sectors and regions, to enable organizations to control and protect their data to an even greater extent – for the Public Sector, with emphasis on trust, transparency, choice, portability. And it is not a surprise that Government and Public Sector bodies are among the leaders in pursuing or considering a sovereign cloud in their organizations.”

“In designing their cloud strategies, organizations should not just focus on compliance requirements but also have a true ‘enterprise view’ of their data. In so doing, they will fully reap the benefits from sovereign cloud, including trust, collaboration, and innovation for even the most sensitive of data areas, and build a competitive advantage or better service for their constituents.”

Web threats ‘increased by over 130%’ at the end of 2021

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According to the data presented by Atlas VPN, web threats have increased by 133% in November and December of 2021, compared to September and October. In addition, JavaScript downloaders and crypto miners were the most active web threats at the end of 2021.
Web threats affect everyone and every device that is connected to the internet. Web threats enter users’ networks without their awareness and can be activated by opening a spam email or clicking on an executable file attachment.
Web threats reached 59,478 unique malicious URLs in September 2021, which resulted in 319,497 total threats. In October, the number kept slightly increasing to 60,440 unique malicious URLs, accumulating 361,184 hits.
November and December months combined accumulated 133% more web threats than September and October. The 84,470 unique malicious URLs in November turned into 833,924 total web threats. Even more, unique malicious URLs were seen in December at 93,999, which aggregated 749,956 threats.
Black Friday and Christmas sales in November and December influenced the rapid increase in web threats. Cybercriminals are particularly active during these seasons as they target e-commerce websites to steal customer personal information.
Cybersecurity writer at Atlas VPN Vilius Kardelis said: “The landscape of web threats has changed dramatically in recent years. Smart devices and high-speed mobile networks have enabled an always-connected route of malware, fraud, and other compromises. The top concern that continues to pose new risks to security and privacy is the lack of caution when using the web.”
Most popular web threats
Cybercriminals can employ different types of web threats to target people’s devices.
JavaScript (JS) downloaders were observed to have 61,283 unique malicious URLs, which accumulated 726,372 total threats from October to December 2021.
From the total of 628,725 crypto miner threats, 59,550 were unique malicious URLs. Web miners that operate in internet browsers demand substantial CPU resources, causing computer use to be exceedingly slow.
Next up, 328,310 web threats were collected from 26,614 unique URLs with web skimmers. JavaScript redirectors amassed 115,497 web threats, of which 4,097 were unique malicious URLs. Finally, web scams accumulated 86,999 total threats, of which 15,130 were unique malicious URLs.

Three reasons the security industry is protecting the wrong thing

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Why is it that the security industry talks about network security, but data breaches? It’s clear that something needs to change, and according to Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks, the change is simple. For too long now, organisations have been focusing on protecting their network, when in fact they should have been protecting their data. Paul outlines three reasons why the securityindustry has been protecting the wrong thing and what they can do to secure their data as we move into 2021…

Reason one: They’re called data breaches, not network breaches, for a reason 

Looking back on some of the biggest data breaches the world has ever seen, it’s clear that cyber hackers always seem to be one step ahead of organisations that seemingly have sufficient protection and technology in place. From the Adobe data breach way back in 2013 that resulted in 153 million user records stolen, to the Equifax data breach in 2017 that exposed the data of 147.9 million consumers, the lengthy Marriott International data breach that compromised the data from 500 million customers over four years, to the recent Solarwinds data breach at the end of 2020, over time it’s looked like no organisation is exempt from the devastating consequences of a cyber hack.

When these breaches hit the media headlines, they’re called ‘data breaches’, yet the default approach to data security for all these organisations has been focused on protecting the network – to little effect. In many cases, these data breaches have seen malicious actors infiltrate the organisation’s network, sometimes for long periods of time, and then have their pick of the data that’s left unprotected right in front of them. 

So what’s the rationale behind maintaining this flawed approach to data protection? The fact is that current approaches mean it is simply not possible to implement the level of security that sensitive data demands as it is in transit without compromising network performance. Facing an either/or decision, companies have blindly followed the same old path of attempting to secure the network perimeter, and hoping that they won’t suffer the same fate as so many before them.

However, consider separating data security from the network through an encryption-based information assurance overlay. Meaning that organisations can seamlessly ensure that even when malicious actors enter the network, the data will still be unattainable and unreadable, keeping the integrity, authentication and confidentiality of the data intact without impacting overall performance of the underlying infrastructure.

Reason two: Regulations and compliance revolve around data 

Back in 2018, GDPR caused many headaches for businesses across the world. There are numerous data regulations businesses must adhere to, but GDPR in particular highlighted how important it is for organisations to protect their sensitive data. In the case of GDPR, organisations are not fined based on a network breach; in fact, if a cyber hacker were to enter an organisation’s network but not compromise any data, the organisation wouldn’t actually be in breach of the regulation at all.

GDPR, alongside many other regulations such as HIPAA, CCPA, CJIS or PCI-DSS, is concerned with protecting data, whether it’s financial data, healthcare data or law enforcement data. The point is: it all revolves around data, but the way in which data needs to be protected will depend on business intent. With new regulations constantly coming into play and compliance another huge concern for organisations as we continue into 2021, protecting data has never been more important, but by developing an intent-based policy, organisations can ensure their data is being treated and secured in a way that will meet business goals and deliver provable and measurable outcomes, rather than with a one-size-fits-all approach.

Reason three: Network breaches are inevitable, but data breaches are not

Data has become extremely valuable across all business sectors and the increase in digitisation means that there is now more data available to waiting malicious actors.

From credit card information to highly sensitive data held about law enforcement cases and crime scenes, to data such as passport numbers and social ID numbers in the US, organisations are responsible for keeping this data safe for their customers, but many are falling short of this duty. With the high price tag that data now has, doing everything possible to keep data secure seems like an obvious task for every CISO and IT Manager to prioritise, yet the constant stream of data breaches shows this isn’t the case. 

But what can organisations do to keep this data safe? To start with, a change in mindset is needed to truly put data at the forefront of all cyber security decisions and investments. Essential questions a CISO must ask include: Will this solution protect my data as it travels throughout the network? Will this technology enable data to be kept safe, even if hackers are able to infiltrate the network? Will this strategy ensure the business is compliant with regulations regarding data security, and that if a network breach does occur, the business won’t risk facing any fines? The answer to these questions must be yes in order for any CISO to trust that their data is safe and that their IT security policy is effective.

Furthermore, with such a vast volume of data to protect, real-time monitoring of the organisation’s information assurance posture is essential in order to react to an issue, and remediate it, at lightning speed. With real-time, contextual meta-data, any non-compliant traffic flows or policy changes can be quickly detected on a continuous basis to ensure the securityposture is not affected, so that even if an inevitable network breach occurs, a data breach does not follow in its wake.

Trusting information assurance

An information assurance approach that removes the misdirected focus on protecting an organisation’s network and instead looks at protecting data, is the only way that the securityindustry can move away from the damaging data breaches of the past. There really is no reason for these data breaches to continue hitting the media headlines; the technology needed to keep data secure is ready and waiting for the industry to take advantage of. The same way that no one would leave their finest jewellery on display in the kitchen window, or leave their passport out for the postman to see, organisations must safeguard their most valuable asset and protect themselves and their reputation from suffering the same fate as many other organisations that have not protected their data. 

Impact of COVID-19 on physical security market revealed

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A new report delivers what it calls the best estimate of the global market for physical security products going forward to 2025, based on two scenarios.

In March 2020, The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. Within a few weeks, it was clear that the pandemic was highly likely to cause the world’s worst recession in the last 100 years. In June 2020, the World Bank published a baseline forecast envisioning a 5.2% contraction in global GDP in 2020.

The report from ResearchandMarkets says that, at this time, COVID-19 has been having second spikes in Q3 / Q4 and several countries are experiencing rolling lockdowns and believes its 2nd scenario looks more feasible where global markets take around a year to return to some normality and mass global adoption of a vaccine is achieved within 18 months. The publisher believes this has a probability of 65%.

Based on its Scenario 2, growth will recover by Q3 2021, and by the end of that year it will have grown by nearly 3%. However, different rates of growth apply in each of the 3 businesses and geographic territories. The analyst forecasts the market will reach over $42Bn by the end of 2025 at a CAGR of 6% over the next 5 years.

China continues to increase its share of the physical security product market. The Chinese market has grown rapidly through a boom in new construction and ‘Sharp Eyes’ surveillance projects driven by the public sector. However very little of this vastly expanding market is accessible to overseas manufacturers, nor is it likely to be in the foreseeable future, with ongoing political and trade tensions between the US and China.

Key Impacts of Covid-19 Pandemic on Physical Security:

  • Above all the COVID-19 outbreak will force suppliers to radically rethink how they operate their business, in particular resilience to externalities. In parallel, there will be lessons to learn on having a more coordinated and resilient supply chain. The Video Surveillance business is too dependent on Chinese OEMs and component manufacturers. With many of these factories closed for the first two months of 2020, it caused temporary supply chain issues.
  • The pandemic has created a demand for new solutions to help control the spread of the virus. Physical security products have risen to the challenge, helping to implement social distancing protocols through existing access and video systems with AI-powered analytics. Thermal cameras have also been deployed to measure people’s temperature, with demand being strong. However, their usefulness has been questioned, with the World Health Organisation saying that on its own temperature screening “may not be very effective”.
  • The report estimates that the total value of world production of Physical Security products at factory gate prices in 2020 will be $31.7Bn, a decline of over 7.5% on 2019. Sales declined over the first 3 quarters of 2020 as a result of COVID-19. This has stopped 11 consecutive years of growth.

Demand for datacentre solutions set to rebound post-COVID

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A return to pre-COVID levels of confidence regarding future demand for datacentres was an encouraging finding from the latest independent industry survey, which captures the views of over 3,000 senior datacentre professionals across Europe, including owners, operators, developers, consultants and end users.

The Winter Report 2020/21, now in its 13th Year is undertaken by independent research house IX Consulting and commissioned by BCS, (Business Critical Solutions) the specialist services provider to the digital infrastructure industry.

Nearly two-thirds of respondents believe that 2021 will see an increase in demand, up on the 40% recorded last year, and now back in line with the long-term trending average. Over the past six months, just over 90% of developer and investor/funder respondents reported an increase in their portfolio of technical real estate, the fourth successive survey that a similar proportion has been achieved, with 85% stating that they expect to see a further expansion over the coming year. This represents a significant recovery from the 45% reported six months ago and sits above the long-term average of around 70% monitored during the decade.

James Hart, CEO at BCS, said: “From the current survey it is encouraging that the reaction which we recorded last year at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic regarding future demand levels for datacentres, has been partially reversed in our latest findings. 

“If there is one thing the coronavirus has proven, it is that when faced with a truly urgent imperative, both the public and private sectors can adapt at astonishing speed and scale. Central to that response has been the data centre which has been the engine room enabling the health response, the mass home working effort, maintaining degrees of business continuity as well as keeping disparate families in contact. Last year our industry showed its resilience, agility and relevance, and this will be the lasting legacy of the pandemic for our sector.”

In addition to the impact of Covid-19 on the industry, other sections of the report include responses on: the threats to the industry; the ranking of choice factors for new datacentres; key drivers for change such as 5G; and further predictions for 2021 and beyond.

Copies of the report can be downloaded at: https://www.bcs.uk.com/data-centre-survey-covid-19-the-lasting-legacy

Data security in the new business world

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By Andrea Babbs, Country Manager and Head of Sales for VIPRE Security Limited

With many businesses having to overhaul their operations overnight to enable their staff to work from home due to Covid-19, maintaining as close to business as usual was an absolute priority. But in the rush to implement collaboration tools to get employees up and running for business continuity, cyber security was pushed further down the list of priorities, potentially putting organisational data at significant risk. 

Many businesses may have already had some level of cyber security protection in place, but the shift in working environments and practices means that the emphasis on data security must be reinforced. Some IT security leaders have seen a 30,000% increase in Covid-19 themed attacks, as cyber-criminals continue to use the current global crisis as an opportunity to target potentially vulnerable end-user systems. With a de-centralised workforce, there is an even greater need for employees to take responsibility for keeping sensitive company information secure, and not just rely on security software to assume the role of data guardian. 

Harder, better, faster

While the transition to remote and flexible working has been implemented gradually across many organisations over the years, the overnight change triggered by government protocol has had a dramatic impact on employee working practices. With no peer review or easy access to conversational questions to quickly ask: “does this email look strange to you?”, employees are potentially at increased risk of falling foul of phishing scams. 

Add to this the heightened pressures of staff feeling the need to work harder, faster, for longer and demonstrate how much they are actually working when at home, it’s no surprise that mistakes are made. For example, responding to emails immediately rather than taking the time to stop and think whether the email is actually genuine, or giving out sensitive information over the phone to be seen as helpful during a difficult and stressful time. 

Reinforcing responsibility

With tools to support employees that reinforce the need to think before they press send on an email, and consider whether it is authentic or not, employees can assume some of the responsibility for keeping data secure. And as 53% of data breaches are classified as insider, clearly the workforce has a critical role to play in an organisation’s cyber defence strategy. 

Businesses can support employees to avoid commonly made mistakes such as forgetting to attach a document when you wrote that you had, or sending misaddressed emails or attaching incorrect information by deploying technology such as VIPRE’s Safe Send which provides a simple safety check. This provides the user with a prompt prior to any email being sent, reminding employees to double check and confirm the addressee and what has been attached. Parameters can also be set to add certain domains to an allow list, or the solution can be deployed on a department or user basis. For example, financial data is highly sensitive, so may require confirmation for all emails, but another department may only need checks on external emails. 

Certain keywords can also be defined, so when those keywords are identified within an email – an unreleased new product name, for example – an additional confirmation is prompted before the email is sent, allowing for that all important double check that the right person is being sent the right information. 

Technology provides a vital piece of the cyber security puzzle through high quality layered protection that covers email security, web and end-point protection. As the threat landscape is arguably evolving at a faster rate than ever before, coupled with the workplace shifting to a new normal – these tools have never been more critical.

Focusing on the user is also key, educating them and empowering them to take some responsibility for data security, supported by innovative software – not just relying on the IT department. Those that adopt such an approach will be far more successful than those that rely on technology in isolation. 

The race to normality

In the rush to keep ‘business as usual’ during such uncertain times, businesses may have inadvertently made their security infrastructure vulnerable to data breach – be that from external threats or accidental insider data leakage. As we slowly make the transition from home working to moving back to the office, or transforming to a hybrid workforce, security needs to be reinforced yet again, with a combination of reminders, prompts and continuous training. 

Employees are a vital tool in a business’ arsenal, so they must be regularly trained and reminded about how they can stay one step ahead of cyber threats. But it’s human nature to make mistakes and as such, employees must be appropriately supported with intuitive technology that can spot anomalies, errors and factors that fall outside of set parameters to highlight where potential threats, scams and faults are about to take place.

Threat to corporate data from departing employees ‘underestimated by businesses’

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More than half (51%) of knowledge workers believe the risk to corporate data from departing employees is being underestimated and bigger than organisations think, while (87%) report their former employer has never approached them to verify they hadn’t taken data when they’ve left a job.

That’s according to Code42’s new Data Exposure Report, which concludes workers believe their employers aren’t protecting themselves against the departing employee insider threat and that data theft is posing a real danger to both former and new employers.

Other key findings from Code42’s new Data Exposure Report on insider threat include:

  • Three-fourths (75%) of respondents say that their new employer did not ask them if they had brought data from their previous employer
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who had infiltrated data were encouraged by their new employers to share it with new colleagues
  • The most common forms of data taken from a previous to a new employer are examples of one’s work (38%), followed by colleagues work and financial records (both 19%)
  • 17% also took customer lists or records, just over one in ten knowledge workers (14%) also took customer’s data — which could lead to a serious violation of GDPR
  • Two-thirds (63%) of respondents who said they have taken data are repeat offenders
  • Staff have the ability to access and therefore exfiltrate: data they didn’t create (73%), data they didn’t contribute to (69%), and 59% can see data from other departments

Code42 surveyed nearly 5,000 knowledge workers at companies with more than 1,000 employees in the U.S., U.K. and Germany.

“When it comes to data loss, leak and theft, for too many companies, the inside is their blindside,” said Joe Payne, Code42’s president and CEO. “Insider threat programs are not keeping up with today’s collaborative work culture. People and data are on the move now more than ever. Workers are switching jobs, and company files are being uploaded to the web, emailed as attachments and synched to personal cloud accounts. Our new report is a wake-up call for security teams that have traditionally relied on prevention-based security strategies for blocking when the rest of their organization is busy sharing.”

Hacking

GUEST BLOG: Combatting the threat of accidental insider data leakage

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By Andrea Babbs, UK General Manager, VIPRE SafeSend

Cybercrime has rapidly become the world’s fastest growing form of criminal activity, and is showing no sign of slowing down with the number of attacks on businesses rising by more than 50% in the last year alone.

While most corporates have made significant efforts to invest in cybersecurity defences to protect their organisations from the outside threat of cybercrime, few have addressed the risk of breaches that stem from the inside in the same way. Insider threats can come from accidental error, such as an employee mistakenly sending a sensitive document to the wrong contact, or from negligence such as an employee downloading unauthorised software that results in a virus spreading through the company’s systems. 

We’re all guilty of accidentally hitting send on an email to the wrong person, or attaching the wrong document; but current levels of complacency around email security culture are becoming an ever greater threat. Few organisations have a clear strategy for helping their employees understand how a simple error can put the company at significant risk; even fewer have a strategy for mitigating that risk and protecting their staff from becoming an inside threat. 

So where does the responsibility lie to ensure that company data is kept secure and confidential? 

According to reports, 34% of all breaches are caused by insider fault, yet many employees are unaware of their responsibility when it comes to data protection. With employee carelessness and complacency the leading causes of data breaches – understandable when human error is inevitable in pressured working environments – there is clearly a lack of awareness and training. And while there is an obvious and urgent need for better employee education, should IT leaders not be doing more to provide the tools that take the risk of making accidental mistakes out of employees’ hands?

With simple technology in place that provides an essential double check for employees – with parameters determined by corporate security protocols – before they send sensitive information via email, accidental data loss can be minimised and an improved and proactive email securityculture achieved. In addition to checking the validity of outbound and inbound email addresses and attachments – thereby also minimising the risk of staff falling foul of a phishing attack – the technology can also be used to check for keywords and data strings in the body of the email, to identify confidential or sensitive data before the user clicks send.

In order for organisations to limit the number of insider data breaches, it’s crucial for employees to understand the role they play in keeping the company’s data secure. But in addition to supporting employees with training, deploying an essential tool that prompts for a second check and warns when a mistake is about to be made, organisations can mitigate the risk of accidental error, and the potentially devastating consequences that might have on the business. 

Email is arguably the key productivity tool in most working environments today; placing the full burden of responsibility for the security of that tool on employees is both an unnecessary overhead and, increasingly, a security risk. In contrast, supporting staff with a simple, extra prompt for them to double check they aren’t mistakenly sharing confidential data raises awareness, understanding and provides that essential security lock-step – before it’s too late. 

Voice biometrics demand to hit $2.8bn by 2024

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The global Voice Biometrics Market size is expected to grow from $984 million in 2019 to $2,845 million by 2024, equivalent to a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 23.7%

That’s according to a new report from MarketsandMarkets, which says the key factors driving demand include an increasing need for robust fraud detection and prevention systems across the Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance (BFSI) industry vertical and a need for reducing authentication and identification costs.

North America is expected to account for the largest market size in the Voice Biometrics Market by region during the forecast period. The region is home to many key vendors, such as Nuance Communications, Verint, and Pindrop.

APAC is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period with increasing investments in strengthening security infrastructure. An increasing demand for cloud-based solutions from retail and eCommerce and healthcare verticals is expected to drive the Voice Biometrics Market in the region.

Overall, the report identifies the key market players as Nuance Communications (US), NICE (Israel), Verint (US), AimBrain (UK), Voice Biometrics Group (US), Phonexia (Czech Republic), OneVault (South Africa), SESTEK (Turkey), LumenVox (US), LexisNexis Risk Solutions (US), VoicePIN (Poland), Uniphore (India), Pindrop (US), Aculab (UK) and Auraya (Australia).

Physical security services market to hit $191.7bn

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The global physical security services market will expand at a CAGR of 11.7% by 2022 to reach $191.7 billion.

That’s according to the latest data from Transparency Market Research (TMR), which pegged the market at $110.3bn in 2017.

In its analysis, TMR says the physical security services market has a consolidative vendor landscape, with prominent players including Tyco International Limited, SECOM Company Limited, The ADT Corp, United Technologies Corporation, and STANLEY Convergent Security Solutions accounting for a lion’s share of revenue.

These players are adopting strategies based primarily on product innovations and new product launches.

Based on the type, the ACaaS segment dominated the global physical security services market and is expected to remain dominant in terms of revenue by accounting US$80.9 bn by the end of 2022.

Region-wise, North America dominated the global physical security services market and is expected to remain dominant over the forecast period from 2017 to 2022 by expanding at a 12.6% CAGR.

In general terms, TMR says the physical security services market is gaining traction due to the need for physical safety to mitigate and reduce crime and risks of the thefts.

Additionally, growing expenses for the physical safety of the infrastructure by organizations coupled with the growing adoption of the internet of things (IoT) devices are supporting growth.

Further, growing penetration of the cloud-based data storage and servers along with growing technological developments, mainly in video surveillance, are contributing toward faster growth of the global physical security services market.

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